TS5Q: Bill Chott

Posted: June 30th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: More Than 100 | Tags: , | 1 Comment »

He’s worked with Johnny Knoxville in the “The Ringer” and a host of precocious tweens on “The Wizards of Waverly Place.” He’s the only person I know to have a direct working relationship to the film “Dude, Where’s My Car?” which actually puts him a single step away from the dreamy Laura Prepon, if you play the Ashton Kutcher card; though we’re equally impressed that he’s a mere jump removed from Steve-O, via Knoxville. With all the work that Chott‘s done between LA and his hometown of Saint Louis, where he runs an improv instruction company called The Improv Trick, he tends to meet a lot of folks.

We root for Bill Chott to become Curly on the big screen. And for his school to take on hundreds of dues-paying students on both the west- and the mid-coast. And for Chott to nail whatever roles come calling between now and May 1, 2011, now that he’s been kind enough to grace us at TS5Q HQ.

And, as a master of improv, Bill’s tweaked our formula a tad, taking our five-part fifth question and engaging it fully. While we don’t know if he thinks spacewomen will come to our planet before an earth-cleansing world war, we do know a bit more about the man, in a general sense, thanks to this cyber-exchange.

Five-a: You lost it as a child and you want it back.
A MAGIC HAT THAT HAD COMPARTMENTS, TRICKS, THINGS IN THE LINING, ETC. THE BOX HAD A PICTURE OF A YOUNG BOY WEARING THE HAT AND A CONSUMER WARNING THAT READ “HAT DOES NOT COME WITH BOY.”

Five-b: You are concerned about your food and its origins.

I LOVE MCDONALD’S DOUBLE DOUBLE. I HAVE NO IDEA IF IT’S MADE OF REAL BEEF OR KANGAROO MEAT AS WAS SUGGESTED IN HIGH SCHOOL

Five-c: These are your generation’s greatest successes.

GULF WAR 1 (THE WAR TO END ALL POPULAR WARS)
THE iPHONE
THE RETURN OF 3D MOVIES

Five-d: For you, this is the book, play, recording, painting, poem, scripture or (item X) that made all the difference.

THE BOOK “THE SCIENCE OF MIND”

Five-e: Do you have a question for me? (What is it?)

WHY DO PEOPLE ANSWER QUIZZES THAT DO NOT INCLUDE A GRADE?


TS5Q: Trent Harris

Posted: June 29th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: More Than 100 | Tags: , | 1 Comment »

Beyond our recent, blossoming Facebook friendship, I don’t know Trent Harris. Though I do know friends of Trent Harris and I also know that he’s the director of some of the most amazing films of the last couple decades, cult classics like “Rubin and Ed,” ‘The Beaver Trilogy” and “Plan 10 From Outer Space.” In fact, at the bottom of this piece, we’ll embed a bit of video from that one, a clip featuring a famous Saint Louisan and a dance scene that’s not to be believed.

You can find information on his varied films here. Our advice: see them all.

Trent Harris was kind enough to send these words prior to an outing the desert. To say that a Trent Harris TS5Q is a real treat is gross understatement. (Thanks to Stefene Russell and Mary Fisher for the hook-up.)

One. Which of the seven deadliest sins make for the best art?
Anger is the muse! Make something about something you are furious about and it will be magnificent. I was working on a tremendous project called “Kiss My Butt You Filthy Beast!” but then my girlfriend left and now I’m not mad anymore and the whole thing fell apart.

Two. For what are you going to need a little more evidence?
Is Glen Beck retarded or just fucking stupid. I need a bit more evidence to figure that out. I know he likes to eat chalk. I know he sometimes argues with ants. And I know he puts beans in his nose. But I can’t quite get a handle on why?

Three. For personal creativity (or productivity), are you better served by contentment or restlessness?
I personally use a Tacion Converter to create. It takes random bits of information and constructs a reality, or if you tune it just right it constructs a narrative. That’s the way everybody creates. They rearrange random. I just cut to the chase and turn on the good old Tacion Converter.

Four. Likeliest occurrence within your lifetime: true peace, total war, or the arrival of spacemen/spacewomen?

Oh God I hope spacewomen come down here. They can stay at my place. Come to think of it I had a spacewoman stay at my place once. She gave me the Tacion Converter.

Five- Do you have a question for me? (What is it?)

Who the heck are you and why in the world would you want me to answer these questions? Are you a spy? Are you gathering evidence? Will you use these words against me when I run for President?


TS5Q: Chris Connelly

Posted: June 24th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: More Than 100 | Tags: | 1 Comment »

Chris Connelly’s been involved in creating no small amount of music over the years, playing with a host of the finest players to ever grace a stage, or record a track, in the fields of industrial and post-punk. And for the better part of the last two-decades, Connelly’s composed a series of solo albums that have some grit, sure, but are based more purely in songcraft than in power. (If needing to start out with just one: it’s a coin-toss between “Shipwreck” or the “Blonde Exodus”/”Ultimate Seaside Companion” double-set.) There have been occasional side projects involving harder sounds, like Murder Inc.. And in a different vein, he’s also authored two books; one a memoir of his time with the Revolting Cocks, plus a due-this-summer novel, “Ed Royal.”

The details you can get from the web.

The motivation for this reach-out, though, is purely specific. As much as look forward to reading the novel and as much as I enjoy the occasional spin of a Connelly disc, I’ll still forever associate him with the 10-member version of Ministry that toured the “The Mind is an Incredible Thing to Taste,” which landed the group at Mississippi Nights in, oh, 1989 or ’90. It was the most influential show I’ll ever take in and it’ll likely always remain locked in the top spot. For that, thanks Chris Connelly. And thanks for flipping TS5Q in a matter of hours, too.

Today, life is good.

One. Which of the seven deadliest sins make for the best art?
WRATH, PRIDE, LUST & ENVY

Two. For what are you going to need a little more evidence?
That there is such a thing as a true, rational human.

Three. For personal creativity (or productivity), are you better served by contentment or restlessness?
I have not experienced contentment, per se, and I have always been restless, this is definitely NOT bad thing.

Four. Likeliest occurrence within your lifetime: true peace, total war, or the arrival of spacemen/spacewomen?

None of the above.

Five-a: You lost it as a child and you want it back.

My father, the greatest man I ever knew. I would like to ask him a long, ever growing list of questions, but for some reason, I think as I get older, I might be answering them by myself with the help of my own Children.

(There’s not a ton of Chris Connelly video on the web, but this one does the job of getting things into a contemporary state:)

(I’d get a lot more done in life if this track, featuring C.C., was injected directly into my veins:)


TS5Q: Thollem McDonas

Posted: June 23rd, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: More Than 100 | Tags: | Comments Off

Once upon a time, I walked into the basement of a bookstore in South Saint Louis and had my head turned around by the music of Thollem McDonas, who played a customized keyboard amidst the high shelves and low pipes. I’d be too hard-pressed to even endeavor a description of the music that night. Instead, I’ll send you to his site. And will advise you catch him live, no matter the venue.

This cat’s amazing and it’s a pleasure to have the following words committed to digital print here.

One. Which of the seven deadliest sins make for the best art?
To tell the truth, for better or worse, I didn’t know what they all were.
I found out, however, and now wish I could go back to my previous innocent/ignorant state.
Since I can’t, I’d say lust DEFINITELY makes for the best art.
Pride is a motivator, and so is wrath, and in sloth can be reflection, the rest are worthless.

Two. For what are you going to need a little more evidence?
Death…I was with my mother when she took her last breath, and also several dogs, but I still can’t believe it.
I’ll believe it when I see it without my own eyes.

Three. For personal creativity (or productivity), are you better served by contentment or restlessness?

Restlessness is necessary, and I’m looking forward to having nothing left to say!

Four. Likeliest occurrence within your lifetime: true peace, total war, or the arrival of spacemen/spacewomen?

I think I know what total war is, the unveiling of what many already experience, and have been readying myself for it my whole life but somehow working/playing for peace simultaneously.
We are spacemen/spacewomen.

Five. Select/discuss any one of the following options.
Five-a: You lost it as a child and you want it back.

The Valley Of Hearts Delight.
It’s now known as Silicon Valley…
Was one of the biologically richest places on earth, now covered with half empty office buildings and fences.
Fucking adults!


TS5Q: Derrick Bostrom

Posted: June 21st, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: More Than 100 | Tags: , | Comments Off

Wow. A response from an original member of The Meat Puppets. Crazy!

You can listen to him on web radio here.

And you can read his words about the varied aspects of life here. (Thanks to Chris King for the hook-up.)

One. Which of the seven deadliest sins make for the best art?
I believe that something is considered as sin if it robs you of your essence, wastes your time, and takes you out of yourself. Therefore, the practice of sin is what keeps you from doing your work. However, the contemplation of sin could lead to great art.

Two. For what are you going to need a little more evidence?

I’m currently compiling evidence as to how I got here. I confess, I still have more than I few more gaps to fill in.

Three. For personal creativity (or productivity), are you better served by contentment or restlessness?

Contentment. Its fleeting moments gives me pause to recharge and collect myself for the next bout with effort.

Four. Likeliest occurrence within your lifetime: true peace, total war, or the arrival of spacemen/spacewomen?

TRUE peace occurs EVERY day. It’s all around us.

Five-a: You lost it as a child and you want it back.

I regret the loss of every day, but if you want the honest answer, I’d say that the day in 1967 when my parents told me they were divorcing is the great line of demarcation in my life. I was six years old and that day was when I learned that life had the potential to be truly dreadful.


TS5Q: Theothorous Athanasious Ellenis

Posted: June 16th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: More Than 100 | Tags: , , | Comments Off

If forced to make the list, Dramarama’s “Anything, Anything (I’ll Give You)” would be an Overall Top Ten choice, a song that I dig today as much as I did when seeing Dramarama at the club Scream in Los Angeles in the mid-’80s. It was the night during which I’d see my first, real, live (and massive) slam pit and the night that cemented Dramarama as a favorite for life.

Theothorous Athanasious Ellenis was the keyboardist for the group on their first two (and most-consistently-awesome) albums, “Cinema Verite” and “Box Office Bomb.” In this process, we search the world for the those who we want to bother using any means necessary. And the Facebook.com social networking utility is quite useful, the exact method by which we tracked down Ted Ellenis, who sets the mark for the most efficient destruction of the TS5Q yet.

1. Which of the seven deadliest sins make for the best art?
Lust.

2. For what are you going to need a little more evidence?
Everything.

3. For personal creativity (or productivity), are you better served by contentment or restlessness?
Restlessness.

4. Likeliest occurrence within your lifetime: true peace, total war, or the arrival of spacemen/spacewomen?
War (unfortunately).

5. c: These are your generation’s greatest successes.

Selfishness to the extreme.


TS5Q No-No: Julia Butterfly Hill

Posted: June 16th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: More Than 100 | Tags: | Comments Off

While driving through scenic Jefferson County, MO, recently, I caught the signal of KDHX, the community radio station in Saint Louis. On the air was “Earthworms,” helmed by longtime environmental talk host Jean Ponzi, with none other than Julia Butterfly Hill. She’s, of course, a longtime presence in environmental circles, herself, often referenced (including here) for her years spent living high-on a redwood tree.

That type of spirit deserves celebration and solid recognition. It might even deserve bugging by the TS5Q field office!

We contacted JBH, oddly enough, while she was in Saint Louis for the wedding of friend and co-conspirator. She declined the chance to tackle TS5Q, though she did so in a way that was a kind and gentle as you’d expect from the source, even going so far as to wish us well with our endeavors.

We wish her well with hers, which you can read about here.


TS5Q: David Greenberger

Posted: June 2nd, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: The List of 100 | Tags: , | 3 Comments »

If zines have meant anything to you over time, it’s possible you remember the first time a zine hit your mailbox, or jumped off the shelf of an indie bookstore. For me, it was a little novelty called “Surge,” which came to me via the USPS, a weeks after stuffing a few dollars into a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Finding “Surge” in the back pages and tiny type of “The Nation”‘s classifieds, I was hooked and not only wanted to self-publish, I wanted to share. To call it a transformative experience, well… yeah, let’s call it just that.

In the next wave of zines to hit home for me was a gentle, clever, funny, suddenly-everywhere zine called “Duplex Planet,” produced by David Greenberger. His story’s been told many times, in many places, but the short summary is that he interviewed the residents of a nursing home, on various, simple and sundry topics. And the answers they provided were an amazing glimpse into the human soul. Sure, some of the answers were lively simply because the old folks answering the questions were making kooky comments about pop culture, but Greenberger’s kind approach and deft editing always ensured that you were laughing with the subjects, rather than at them.

Over the years I’d collect a few more “Planet”‘s, here and there. I’d buy a best-of compilation, which got claimed in The Great Basement Flood of Whatever Year that Was. And I plan on securing a lot of 50, for only $35!, available here.

His multi-media work’s been a huge influence, so what an honor it is to have David Greenberger answer TS5Q:

One. Which of the seven deadliest sins make for the best art?
Curiosity and confusion. Oh wait – those aren’t sins, thankfully.

Two. For what are you going to need a little more evidence?

That the Titanic hit an iceberg.

Three. For personal creativity (or productivity), are you better served by contentment or restlessness?

Contentment.

Four. Likeliest occurrence within your lifetime: true peace, total war, or the arrival of spacemen/spacewomen?
None of the three. Chimpanzees will learn to take dogs for walks, and clean up after them.

Five. Select/discuss any one of the following options.
Five-a: You lost it as a child and you want it back.

I was no longer a child, probably was 21 or so and living in Boston, but I lost a scarf that my grandmother, Goldene Greenberger, had made. She didn’t make it for me, but for my father who, having moved out of winter’s hold, no longer needed it. It had a feel, weave and color unlike any other scarf I’ve ever had. As happens with the extra, detachable winter garb, it must have gotten left somewhere or got dropped. My searches the day after were unsuccessful.

Five-d: For you, this is the book, play, recording, painting, poem, scripture or (item X) that made all the difference.
Painting: “Speedboat’s Wake” by Milton Avery
Recording
: “The Forrest” by Robert Wyatt
Book: “Eunoia” by Christian Bok